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Maths + Dreams = Kids who can

Midrand’s Digital Divide

The fact that you are reading this blog posting means that YOU are on the resourced side of the ‘digital divide’. The digital divide is that imaginary divide (or donga in South African speak) that separates those who have proper access to modern technologies and those who don’t. In Midrand, the N1 almost serves as a physical expression of the gap between the the two. Can you imagine life without a computer? Can you imagine life without the internet? Or life without email? For many of us, these technologies are so ingrained in our everyday way of doing things that we’ve taken them for granted.

Not so for the vast majority of Ivory Park. Even where there are schools with computers and internet, this does not immediately translate into IT-equipped individuals. In many schools, computer labs are barely used or remain locked because the teachers are overburdened or require more training. The really tragic aspect to this is that the proper and sustained use of IT-technology has the potential to serve as a real development-enabler and a means by which to tackle a whole variety of developmental needs. Just think about the need for clear and accurate information with regards to health, social benefits, quality curriculum delivery, up-to-date news and communication methods… the list is long.

Since February this year, Siyakhula have enabled 70 students to become computer literate (most of these students had no previous computer knowledge whatsoever). This is, of course, the tip of the ice-berg but it is a start. Would you be interested in joining our team of volunteer trainers? Classes run on Saturday mornings and require a commitment of 6-8 weeks. Email me if you are interested.

Alternatively, would you be willing to inform your company about us? To put it simply, the more computers we have the more students we can teach. We’re looking for fast Pentium IVs (i.e. your old stock)

If you missed the Siyakhula Schools Enrichment Programme insert, click here and please pass on to anyone who might be interested.

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